Disney Princesses Don’t Wear Glasses

We've all grown up with Disney princesses- and from Snow White (1937) to Moana (2017) we've seen a diverse range. We've had a medieval Scottish princess, an African-American frog princess, and a...Mermaid? I mean... that's pretty diverse, right? SHE HAS A TAIL!   Of course people want to see more diversity in the princesses- because… Continue reading Disney Princesses Don’t Wear Glasses

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Work Placement Day 2: Pumpkin’s Poems, Farmyard Fun and the Amazing Push Poem Machine

Today we returned to Rice Lane City Farm to work on more poems with the children at the playscheme. We brought with us The Amazing Push Poem Machine, which has been part of The Windows Project since the 70's. To use the push poem machine, you throw a small ball at it, which will (hopefully)… Continue reading Work Placement Day 2: Pumpkin’s Poems, Farmyard Fun and the Amazing Push Poem Machine

The Genius of Humans of New York: or, Why Everyone’s Story Matters

Anyone familiar with Facebook is also likely familiar with the popular photoblog, Humans of New York. It is a relatively simple idea- the creators take a picture of somebody on the streets of New York City, and ask them questions- which results in the excerpt that accompanies their photograph, which can be anything from a… Continue reading The Genius of Humans of New York: or, Why Everyone’s Story Matters

“Only Amnesiacs Have No Regrets”- Jean-Michel Guenassia’s The Incorrigible Optimists Club

"Only amnesiacs have no regrets" is perhaps one of the most profound statements in Jean-Michel Guenassia's The Incorrigible Optimists Club. It holds particular relevance with the novel itself, as the club is made up of members who fled from behind the iron curtain, leaving jobs, wives and children behind them for the sake of their lives and… Continue reading “Only Amnesiacs Have No Regrets”- Jean-Michel Guenassia’s The Incorrigible Optimists Club

Trains of Thought: or, How to Find Writing Inspiration on Public Transport

For anyone who has ever travelled on trains in Britain recently, it's quite difficult to see how inspiration for one of the most popular series of our time came while J K Rowling was sat on one. Was she not distracted by the screaming children? Or more concerned about whether or not she was on… Continue reading Trains of Thought: or, How to Find Writing Inspiration on Public Transport

The Girls by Emma Cline

Emma Cline's The Girls tells the story of Evie Boyd, an ex-member of a cult in 1970's  Petaluma, California. The novel begins properly with Evie's present- a somewhat run-of-the-mill, paycheck to paycheck life, in which she house-sits in various places and does little else. However, we have already been introduced to her colorful past in the two… Continue reading The Girls by Emma Cline

“Board my body up. I’m not for loving. Anymore”- Love is a Half-Formed Thing

Through studying Irish fiction, I finally got around to reading Eimear McBride's A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing. After getting past the original difficulty with McBride's stream-of-consciousness narrative, what I found was a particularly disturbing novel that has stuck with me for some time. McBride's next novel, The Lesser Bohemians, whilst slightly less difficult to read (in no… Continue reading “Board my body up. I’m not for loving. Anymore”- Love is a Half-Formed Thing